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Sustainable Rivers

Sustainable Rivers

The fundamental goal of the Sustainable Rivers Program (SRP) is to identify, refine, and implement environmental strategies at Corps water infrastructure.

SRP works with water managers, reservoir operators, scientists, and other stakeholders to increase the environmental benefits provided by already built infrastructure.

SRP efforts complement other reservoir-centric water resource projects by demonstrating that a strategic and science-based approach can be used at USACE projects to maintain or enhance benefits provided to the nation.

Sustainable Rivers is an ongoing national program to increase environmental benefits provided by Corps already built water resources projects.  As of 2019, Sustainable Rivers involved work on 66 Corps reservoirs in 16 river systems and 5,083 river miles.
Sustainable Rivers Program - Sustainable Rivers is an ongoing national program to increase environmental benefits provided by Corps already built water resources projects. As of 2019, Sustainable Rivers involved work on 66 Corps reservoirs in 16 river systems and 5,083 river miles.
A science-based process was used to define environmental flow targets for the Des Moines River. Water managers and reservoir operators are considering how  to implement and incorporate those targets into operations.
Des Moines River below Lake Red Rock, Iowa - A science-based process was used to define environmental flow targets for the Des Moines River. Water managers and reservoir operators are considering how to implement and incorporate those targets into operations (USACE photo).
Paddlers explore Green River below Green River Dam.  The river is rich in biodiversity and provides excellent opportunities for people to enjoy nature as it flows past several downstream human communities, through Mammoth Cave National Park, and on to its confluence with the Ohio River.
Green River, Kentucky - Paddlers explore Green River below Green River Dam. The river is rich in biodiversity and provides excellent opportunities for people to enjoy nature as it flows past several downstream human communities, through Mammoth Cave National Park, and on to its confluence with the Ohio River (photo by John Hickey, USACE).
The vast bottomland hardwood forest downstream of the John H. Kerr Dam on the Roanoke River. Improved environmental flows through the dam help maintain this critical floodplain forest.
Roanoke River, North Carolina - The vast bottomland hardwood forest downstream of the John H. Kerr Dam on the Roanoke River. Improved environmental flows through the dam help maintain this critical floodplain forest (USACE photo).
The Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge is downstream of Alamo Dam and is home to more than 300 species of birds and an array of native riparian flora.
Willamette River, Oregon - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates 13 reservoirs in the Willamette Basin. Considering all operating purposes in a way that maximizes benefits, including healthy aquatic and riparian ecosystems, is key to long-term sustainability (USACE photo).
Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. The Bill Williams River drains more than 5,200 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain in west-central Arizona. It is the largest tributary of the Colorado River (in the background here) between the Virgin and Gila Rivers.
Bill Williams River, Arizona - Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. The Bill Williams River drains more than 5,200 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain in west-central Arizona. It is the largest tributary of the Colorado River (in the background here) between the Virgin and Gila Rivers (photo by Greg Bedinger/LightHawk).

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